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20121111
20121111
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)
>>> this morning on "meet the press" -- an unfolding scandal in washington. and a new battle over the fiscal cliff. the election celebration is short-lived. a surprise resignation by cia director david petraeus comes days before congressional hearings over the attack on th u.s. consulate in benghazi. we'll get reaction this morning from capitol hill and the very latest reporting on this developing story from our chief foreign affairs correspondent andrea mitchell, who broke the story friday afternoon. also the president and republicans get set to negotiate new taxes and spending cuts. is a breakthrough possible? >> i'm open to compromise. i'm open to new ideas. we've debated over and over again. and on tuesday night we found out that the majority of americans agree with my approach. >> mr. president, this is your moment. we're ready to be led. not as democrats or republicans but as americans. now, we want you to lead. >> where does it all go from sneer we'll ask democratic senator from new york chuck schumer and republican senator from oklahoma tom coburn. also we check in with cn
both chambers. >> schieffer: if upcertainty over making a deal were not enough, washington was rocked by the scandal involving c.i.a. chief david petraeus. we'll get the latest on petraeus and the chances of compromise on the financial argument from republican senator lindsey graham. we'll get insight on the pretty thinking from his top strategist, david axelrod. then we'll go to our all-star panel of analysts. peggy noonan of the ""wall street journal"." david gergen of harvard university. dee dee myers of "vanity fair." and our own john dickerson. election 2012 is in the bookes, but the story is just beginning. and this is "face the nation." captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news in washington, "face the nation" with bob schieffer. >> schieffer: good morning, again. on this veteran's day. and we begin with senator graham who is in clemson, south carolina. senator, thank you for coming. you are on the armed services committee, of course, so i want to start out with this out-of-the blue thunderbolt that hit washington friday concerning david petraeus the c.i.a. director. he resigne
party in washington, the party of money. and frankly, if you or i were elected to congress, we'd have to behave like every member of congress does if we want to get reelected, which means we have to his top the people who provide the money for the campaigns for us to run to office, and it's not just joe six pack and mary smith. it's representatives of big corporations and wealthy individuals who come pleading, i just need a little change here to be fair. but they really want to unlevel the playing field and thwart the rigors of the market. there's no such thing as deregulation. that's only new regulation, so what we have done is taken regulations -- i'm not going to defend every regulation, but we took a regulatory scheme that looked at the interests of companies and the interests of customers and other parties, and replaced it with a system of the corporations, by the corporations, that takes away consumer rights. everything is regulated. i like to say, baseball regulates right down to how many stitches on the ball and the color of yarn. everything is regulated. most of the regulatio
on the day that we pay tribute to them. and women are on the way. washington will never be the same. but first, the president's lease on the white house has just been extended. just what is the mandate? >>> good morning. i'm melissa harris-perry. all week the democratic and republican political operatives and strategists have been sifting through exit polling data trying to piece together the how and why of president obama's reelection. poring over data of turnout and the racial and socioeconomic composition of the winning coalition and breakdowns of what issues drove the electorate to the polls, all the pundits and prognosticators were looking for the formula that added up to a win for the president. now, clearly nate silver has decoded the calculus of probability. but now the question shifted from who will win to what are the voters trying to tell us? and not even nate did definitively answer that. here's what we do know. voters turned out for president barack obama in droves. despite having a somewhat smaller electoral map than in 2008, this is one of the biggest democratic wins
running the house. that's what prevailed before americans voted, when deadlock reigned in washington, little got done, and the country was frustrated and angry. are we in for more of the same? the talk we are hearing in washington sounds altogether too familiar. so let's consider what's ahead with two people of different philosophies about what should be done. bob herbert was a long-time liberal columnist for "the new york times" until he retired last year and became a distinguished senior fellow for the national think tank demos. he's been on the road for months now, reporting for his forthcoming book, "wounded colossus." reihan salam writes "the agenda," that's a daily blog for the conservative national review online. he is a policy advisor at the think tank economics 21 and a columnist for reuters. he is also the co-author with ross douthat of the much talked-about book, "grand new party: how republicans can win the working class and save the american dream." welcome to both of you. >> great to see you, bill. >> bob, what will you remember about this election? >> well, the first t
, not a word we hear often in washington. if there is compromise to avoid this fiscal cliff, where does it come? john boehner indicated, revenue is possible, but we're not raising tax rates. where is there compromise? >> i think where there's going to be a compromise on taxes, this be would be a good thing on the economy, might exchange lower tax rates in return for a reduction in all the loopholes that as it is distort economic activity. so if boehner were able to achieve that kind of compromise, that's one that the republicans could be pleased with. the bush tax cuts are gone, they're expiring, and the president said that 250,000 below, he wants that extended, but for those making more than 250, will the bush tax cuts come to an end? >> i don't think so. i think actually the they won't come to an end because the democrats don't want major reduction in spending, if you hit the cliff, the spending would go down and politicians love to spend money. an extension of the bush tax cuts, less we're blessed by the relatively few, jeff baso, the late steve jobs, you want to remove the barriers to their
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)